Probiotic Bacteria Guide - Probiotics

Probiotic Bacteria Guide

Probiotic Bacteria Guide

What's your health goal? There is a bac for that.

While commercial advertising tends to lump all probiotics together, the reality is that probiotic bacteria come from a number of different species, each boasting different benefits. This guide will help you understand what’s out there, and the different role each species can play in maintaining overall wellness.

Learn to speak probiotics

Reading a probiotic label doesn’t need to feel like reading a foreign language.

Lactobacillus Acidophilus M22 = Lactobacillus (genus), acidophilus (species), M22 (strain code)

What’s a strain code?

Strain codes — unique alphanumeric sequences following the genus and species — refer to the specific strain of that species studied by researchers and included in a brand’s product.

Power Teams

While different species provide different benefits, much of the research done on probiotics evaluates a number of species taken at once. And, most probiotics found on store shelves are combination supplements, offering multiple strains for maximum efficacy. Specifically, research on L. gasseri, B. bifidum, and B. longum together have found that this powerful combination can:

  • Support healthy digestion
  • Manage seasonal allergy symptoms
  • Decrease severity and shorten duration of common cold symptoms

Lactobacillus Genus4,5

The Lactobacillus genus is a critical component of the gut microbiome. Generally, the role of this genus is to metabolize glucose to produce lactic acid, which is beneficial for the digestive tract since “bad” bacteria have trouble surviving in an alkaline environment. In action, this translates to body-wide benefits depending on the species.

Lactobacillus acidophilus6

What It Does

Colonizes in the small intestine, and helps ensure proper nutrient absorption and digestion of dairy foods.7

Supports:

Overall Digestive Health & Vaginal Health8

Lactobacillus gasseri

What It Does

The main species of lactobacilli in the human gut, L. gasseri seems to reduce fatty acid levels in the blood, promoting healthy weight and a healthy gut.

Supports:

Overall Digestive health, Immune Health & Healthy Weight Maintenance9,10

Lactobacillus rhamnosus11

What It Does

One of the most widely used and studied probiotic strains, L. rhamnosus is known to be resistant to stomach acid and bile, which means it can survive transit to the lower gastrointestinal tract, colonize the intestine, and grow rapidly.

Supports:

Digestive Comfort, Immune and Inflammatory Health, Dental Health & Vaginal Health12,13

Lactobacillus plantarum14

What It Does

L. plantarum produces its own antibiotics, which target bad bacteria. Plus, it can survive from mouth to colon with ease.

Supports:

Overall Digestive Health & Immune Health

Lactobacillus paracasei

What It Does

Restores gut microflora and intestinal barrier function.

Supports:

Liver Health15

Bifidobacterium Genus

The Bifidobacterium genus represents the first microbes to colonize in the human gut after birth, but by adulthood, it makes up just about 3 to 6 percent of the total gut microbial population. Essentially, these bacteria help digest dietary fiber and other complex carbohydrates. When they do so, they produce short chain fatty acids, which have been known to support overall gut health and provide other benefits for the body.

Bifidobacterium bifidum

What It Does

B. Bifidum is one of the most common probiotic bacteria found in the body. Located in the colon, lower small intestine, and in breast-milk, this species can produce natural antibiotic substances to battle ‘bad’ bacteria.

Supports:

Overall digestive health, Digestive comfort, Immune health

Bifidobacterium longum

What It Does

Produces lactic acid from the fermentation of sugar in the gut.

Supports:

Overall gastrointestinal health, Gut comfort

Bifidobacterium lactis

What It Does

Breaks down body waste and aids in the absorption of nutrients.

Supports:

Gut regularity, Digestive comfort, Immune health

Bifidobacterium breve

What It Does

Capable of breaking down many kinds of food — even plant fibers that can be considered indigestible — B. breve is important for colon function. It ferments sugars to produce lactic and acetic acid.

Supports:

Healthy immune response

Bifidobacterium infantis

What It Does

One of the first probiotics a mother passes to her baby, B. infantis produces large amounts of acid to make the digestive tract inhospitable to foreign bacteria.

Supports:

Overall digestive health and comfort, Immune health, Gut comfort (bloating constipation)

References

  1. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2014.983249
  2. Dennnis-Wall JC et al. “Probiotics (Lactobacillus gasseri KS-13, Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1, and Bifidobacterium longum MM-2) improve rhinoconjunctivitis-specific quality of life in individuals with seasonal allergies: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.” Am J Clin Nutr
    2017;105:758–67.
  3. doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2005.02.006
  4. https://www.britannica.com/science/Lactobacillus
  5. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019643990800007X
  6. https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-acidophilus/art-20361967
  7. From Wakunaga chart
  8. https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-acidophilus/art-20361967
  9. Kubota A, He F, et al. Microbiol Immunol. 2009;53(4):198-205.
  10. https://kellmancenter.com/2014/09/the-miracle-weight-loss-probiotic/
  11. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/immunology-and-microbiology/lactobacillus-rhamnosus
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12788576
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11799281
  14. https://probiotics.org/l-plantarum/
  15. https://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpgi.00188.2010
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4908950/
  17. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128040249000136
  18. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/why-bifidobacteria-are-good
  19. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128040249000148
  20. https://probiotics.org/b-bifidum/
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4171173/
  22. http://www.winchesterhospital.org/health-library/article?id=699206
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24242237
  24. https://www.livestrong.com/article/375423-what-is-bifidobacterium-longum/
  25. Diop L, Guillou S, et al. Nutr Res. 2008;28(1):1-5.
  26. Pitkala KH, Strandberg TE, et al. J Nutr Health Aging. 2007;11(4):305-11
  27. https://probiotics.org/bifidobacterium-lactis/
  28. https://www.uniprot.org/proteomes/UP000008279
  29. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B978012804024900015X
  30. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2886445/
  31. https://probiotics.org/9-health-benefits-of-bifidobacterium-infantis/

Find the Probiotic for you

Learn more about probiotics and what they can do for you and your family.
Get personalized information and options here.

Answer a few short questions to get started.

Find the Probiotic for you

Learn more about probiotics and what they can do for you and your family.
Get personalized information and options here.

Answer a few short questions to get started.
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